NTMWD Plant Smart 2024

Trade enforcement creates American jobs

by | Jul 16, 2020 | Opinion

Roughly one in four American workers has filed for unemployment since the pandemic began. To stem the historic tide of unemployment, policymakers quickly put together a series of legislative packages to help companies keep their workers on payroll.

An often-overlooked economic stimulus that requires no additional spending of federal dollars is trade enforcement. Virtually every country in the world has signed up to rules that require them to treat U.S. exports and U.S. companies fairly. If our trading partners would fulfill the commitments they have made and provide a level playing field for U.S. companies, U.S. companies could sell more products and services in those markets to boost American jobs.

Unfortunately, our trading partners often don’t play by the rules they agreed to. They subject U.S. companies to more regulation than their domestic companies. They block U.S. companies from operating freely in their markets to protect a domestic company from competition. Or they purposely undervalue or outright steal U.S. companies’ innovative ideas.

In fact, some of the worst trade violations involve other countries’ treatment of America’s intellectual property rights, the intangible yet incredibly valuable rights that protect the movies, music, software, medicines, and innumerable innovative products that Americans are so good at inventing.

Our country’s intellectual property assets total around $6.6 trillion. Intellectual property-intensive industries employ some 45 million Americans who earn about 46 percent more, on average, than their counterparts in other areas of the economy. These are the advanced industries of the future that will create jobs far faster than other sectors and are invaluable in our current economic crisis. Altogether, intellectual property theft sucks up to $600 billion out of the U.S. economy every year.

When Brazil, India, or South Africa fail to respect global copyright norms, set designers, studio musicians, engineers, programmers, and others in America lose out on work. When Canada, Japan, or South Korea refuse to pay anything more than a fraction of the fair cost of a medicine researched, developed, and sold by a U.S. company, that company can’t hire the next researcher to discover the next new medicine. And when Indonesia, Thailand, and Vietnam require companies to build costly local data centers, create new taxes on goods and services sold online, or block U.S. streaming companies from operating in their markets, these countries limit or block the opportunity of U.S. tech firms to win new customers abroad and hire more U.S. workers at home.

For these reasons, a broad coalition of business associations from across the economy has banded together to form the Alliance for Trade Enforcement. While we believe opening new markets is also important, we will focus our efforts on calling attention to longstanding barriers that are depressing U.S. job growth in key sectors of the American economy. We will advocate for the U.S. government to leverage existing trade agreements and the tools those agreements provide to force our trading partners to fulfill the commitments they have made to us to maintain a level playing field for U.S. companies.

By getting our trading partners to treat U.S. companies and U.S. investments fairly, as they have agreed to do, the Alliance for Trade Enforcement seeks to increase exports, support U.S. workers, and help grow the economy at a time when growth is so badly needed.

This piece originally ran in the International Business Times.

For more stories like this, see the July 16 issue or subscribe online.

By Brian Pomper, executive director of the Alliance for Trade Enforcement

NTMWD Plant Smart 2024

0 Comments

Related News

Verses Versus Verses

Verses Versus Verses

If you’re a Baptist from the South, you’re hoping that if there’s a Pearly Gates pop quiz, the question isn’t, “What’s the third verse to any song in the hymnal?” You won’t know the answer. If you’re laughing right now, you know exactly what I’m talking about. In...

read more
Meat and Greet

Meat and Greet

Barbecue may not be the road to world peace, but it’s a start.” – Anthony Bourdain Barbecue is a versatile word. It can refer to an outdoor place to cook meat; to cooking meat; and can also reference a gathering of people for the purpose of serving meat cooked...

read more
Real good eatin’

Real good eatin’

My grandfather called it a “Po Boy Lunch.” That meant we were having leftovers in whatever creative way my grandmother came up with. Recently, I took two biscuits from breakfast and loaded them with smoked brisket, and from the garden, purple onions and jalapeños. A...

read more
Comic Relief

Comic Relief

People use different ways to learn to read. Some folks use the vowels and consonants method. Others memorize how the words look.  I used both, but I had a secret weapon many didn’t know about.  Comic books.  While most kids were having, “Fun with Dick...

read more
35 Texas counties eligible for individual disaster aid

35 Texas counties eligible for individual disaster aid

Residents in a total of 35 Texas counties now qualify for individual disaster assistance following a series of severe storms and flooding that began in late April, The Dallas Morning News reported. “I thank our federal partners and emergency response personnel across...

read more
Texas could face long-term water supply deficit

Texas could face long-term water supply deficit

Texas is facing a reckoning on water that we must address if the state wants to secure its future prosperity. The State Water Plan prepared by the Texas Water Development Board projects that Texas faces a long-term water supply deficit of 6.9 million acre-feet in 50...

read more
Hogging the channels

Hogging the channels

 I have a lot of my grandparents in me. I’m cheap. I also love the Arkansas Razorbacks. Nowhere is this truer than when it comes to radio, television, and an Arkansas game. I grew up listening to free radio and watching free television. So, the idea of paying...

read more
Laundry: There’s more than one way to fold

Laundry: There’s more than one way to fold

You would think that there’s only one way to fold towels. But, you’d be wrong. Growing up in Ashdown, Arkansas, my momma showed me how to fold them, as well as shirts, socks, underpants, and other personal sundries. I assumed that this skillset would carry me all the...

read more
The Lawn Moore

The Lawn Moore

America really is The Land of Opportunity. Even if there’s only one opportunity, and that opportunity is cutting the grass.  Ashdown, Arkansas, was a pretty typical small American town in the 1960s and 1970s.  Kids weren’t just handed things. If we wanted...

read more
A myth understanding

A myth understanding

In the South, we believed with all of our hearts what we were told when we were children. Even if it was wrong. In the 1960s, the RCA color console TV my family had on Beech Street in Ashdown, Arkansas, could make you go blind. It could if you believed what our mom...

read more
Subscribe Love