Order photos

Terrorism prevention programs across Texas to receive funding

by | Oct 24, 2019 | Opinion

Gov. Greg Abbott on Oct. 15 announced $61.2 million in Homeland Security Grant Program funding to support state and local efforts to prevent terrorism and prepare for threats that pose the greatest risk to the security of Texans.

The awards, released primarily to cities and counties across Texas, include 264 projects under the State Homeland Security Program and 136 projects through the Urban Area Security Initiative.

“As governor, my top priority is keeping our communities safe,” Abbott said in a news release. “These grants will ensure our communities have the resources they need to counter terrorism statewide and enhance security for all Texans. Our ongoing efforts to keep Texas safe would not be possible without our partnership with the federal government, and I thank them for their continued assistance.”

Larger expenditures of grant monies would be applied as follows:

—$24.3 million to provide equipment, training and exercise support for local, regional and state-level response teams such as SWAT, bomb, HAZMAT and search and rescue, and for other law enforcement, fire and emergency medical services personnel that serve communities across the state;

—$13.4 million to support statewide planning and preparedness efforts that provide the foundation for effective homeland security capability development and implementation;

—$8.3 million to sustain and enhance operational communications capabilities facilitating information sharing and coordination essential for the successful response to all types of threats and hazards; and

—$3.2 million to support state and regional fusion centers promoting ongoing intelligence and information sharing capabilities and analysis, production and exchange of critical threat data between federal, state and local partners.

Research first, then vote

Ballots in the Nov. 5 election will include proposed constitutional amendments, special elections and local political subdivision elections, including those for mayor, city council, school board, municipal utility districts and other local entities.

Texas Secretary of State Ruth Hughs on Oct. 16 encouraged eligible voters to take advantage of the early voting period ahead of the election, which began on Oct. 21 and will end on Nov. 1.

Hughs, the state’s chief election officer, also urged voters to research the candidates, amendments and measures that will appear on their ballots as they prepare to make their voices heard.

Voters with questions about how to cast a ballot in upcoming elections may call 1-800-252-VOTE.

AG announces set­tle­ment

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton on Oct. 18 announced a $117 million multistate settlement with Johnson & Johnson and its subsidiary Ethicon Inc. for deceptively marketing transvaginal surgical mesh devices.

Texas was joined in the lawsuit by 40 other states and the District of Columbia. The Lone Star State’s share of the settlement is nearly $9 million.

Transvaginal surgical mesh is a synthetic material that is surgically implanted through the vagina to support the pelvic organs of women who suffer from stress urinary incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse.

The settlement was reached after a multistate investigation, launched in 2012, found that the companies failed to adequately disclose the products’ possible side effects.

Jobless rate stays low

The Texas Workforce Commission on Oct. 18 announced that the Texas economy added 7,600 seasonally adjusted total nonfarm positions in September and the unemployment rate held steady at 3.4 percent for the fourth month in a row.

The September unemployment rate matches the all-time record low first set in June, the lowest recorded unemployment rate since series tracking began in 1976.

Leading job growth in September was the professional and business services sector, which added 9,600 jobs. The construction sector followed, adding 7,200 jobs. Education and health services added another 1,800 jobs.

The Midland Metropolitan Statistical Area recorded August’s lowest unemployment rate among Texas MSAs with a non-seasonally adjusted rate of 2.0 percent, followed by the Amarillo MSA at 2.5. The Austin-Round Rock, College Station-Bryan and Odessa MSAs each recorded the third-lowest rate at 2.6 percent.

Effort promotes safety

Nov. 7, 2000 was the last deathless day on Texas roadways, and since that day, fatalities resulting from vehicle crashes on Texas roadways have numbered more than 65,000, according to the Texas Department of Transportation.

In its “Be Safe. Drive Smart” campaign, TxDOT is taking safety messages to community events in the oil-and-gas producing Permian Basin and Eagle Ford Shale regions, where driving-related fatalities are high. The campaign is part of #EndTheStreakTX, a social media and word-of-mouth effort that encourages drivers to make safer choices while on the road.

 

For more stories like this, see the Oct. 24 issue or subscribe online.

 

By Ed Sterling • Member Services Director, Texas Press Association

Subscribe Mothers Day 2024 Leaderboard

0 Comments

Related News

Laundry: There’s more than one way to fold

Laundry: There’s more than one way to fold

You would think that there’s only one way to fold towels. But, you’d be wrong. Growing up in Ashdown, Arkansas, my momma showed me how to fold them, as well as shirts, socks, underpants, and other personal sundries. I assumed that this skillset would carry me all the...

read more
The Lawn Moore

The Lawn Moore

America really is The Land of Opportunity. Even if there’s only one opportunity, and that opportunity is cutting the grass.  Ashdown, Arkansas, was a pretty typical small American town in the 1960s and 1970s.  Kids weren’t just handed things. If we wanted...

read more
A myth understanding

A myth understanding

In the South, we believed with all of our hearts what we were told when we were children. Even if it was wrong. In the 1960s, the RCA color console TV my family had on Beech Street in Ashdown, Arkansas, could make you go blind. It could if you believed what our mom...

read more
On the road again and again

On the road again and again

Back in the 60s, some American college kids protested the Vietnam War, but mostly, they conducted sit-ins. Few protests were violent. Other American college kids would have contests to see how many of them they could cram into a Volkswagen. Today, some college kids...

read more
Aisle be seeing you

Aisle be seeing you

As a child growing up in Ashdown, Arkansas, we had two main grocery stores. Shur-Way and Piggly Wiggly. Or as my dad called it, “Hoggly Woggly.” A trip to the store was like each TV commercial had come to life. Advertising agencies at the time were very good at what...

read more
Just plane fun

Just plane fun

My wife and I are scheduled for an Alaskan cruise in the fall. By all accounts, it’s something to which we should look forward. I’ve been told the same thing about other trips, including a Vegas excursion that included a stay at a strip motel that still had beds that...

read more
Fixer Uppers

Fixer Uppers

Recently, I saw something I haven’t seen in many years. A young man driving a car he was fixing up. It was an older Mustang. By older I mean a 90’s model. The car had spots of primer, there were a few dents, and the exhaust system appeared to be loose. By John Moore...

read more
Who’s counting when it comes to columns?

Who’s counting when it comes to columns?

When this newspaper column began in 2014, my wife asked me a question. Wife: “How long do you intend to write this column?” Me: “Oh, I don’t know. I guess I’ll write 500 of them and then hang it up. This column is number 500. By Bob Moore For more stories about the...

read more
Don’t eat that

Don’t eat that

When I was a kid, I had to sneak around if I wanted to eat certain things. Now that I’m an adult and in charge, I still have to sneak around if I want to eat certain things. I miss the days when no one knew anything about gluten, trans fats, cholesterol,...

read more
Texas counties among nations’s fastest growing

Texas counties among nations’s fastest growing

Recent estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau indicate that six of the 10 fastest-growing counties in the United States from 2022 to 2023 were in Texas. According to the Texas Tribune, Kaufman County, just east of Dallas, led the list with a 7.6% increase in new...

read more
Subscribe Love